Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Long Live The Queen

Today something important happened. Very important. It didn’t make the six o’clock news. Probably won’t make the papers. And no doubt you went about your life as usual today, unaware of the ripple this event caused in the pond of life. Early this morning, without pomp and circumstance, a virgin Mary gave birth to her child in a stable.

It just so happens that Mary was an English Longhorn cow and her child a product of artificial insemination.

So why is this so important? Because before today there were only ten female English Longhorn cattle in the United States. Now there are eleven, a ten percent increase in the breeding capacity of this extremely rare breed. In fact, they are so rare the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy doesn’t even include them as a viable breed; their requirements being 20 females in 5 herds. Conner Prairie is the only public place in the U.S. to have this breed on display.

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The English Longhorn is one of the oldest breeds of English cattle, believed by some to predate the Roman occupation of England. Popular in early America at one time, the breed lost favor around 1850 as the more fashionable Shorthorn took it’s place. It resulted in extinction of the breed on U.S. soil.

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This ancient breed has returned and is increasing it’s numbers by utilizing the latest technology. Embryos from English Longhorn donor cows were frozen and shipped across the pond to the US where they were implanted into recipient cows. Mary was the product of that transfer. Not only will the sweet little heifer calf born today continue to increase the number of cattle, she will at some point be the successor of Mary. Of course it seemed appropriate to name her Elizabeth.

So you see, today was an important day. A queen was born to a virgin Mary in a stable. An event which will change history.

Long live the queen! Hip, hip, huzzah! Hip, hip, huzzah! Hip, hip, huzzah!

17 comments:

Milah Frost said...

I'll have to share this with some of the shorthorn breeders I know. She sure is cute, I love the brown nose and ears! I'm assuming she'll have long horns? Gosh, this may require a visit to Conner Prairie, as I do love and miss calving on our farm.

Christine said...

Did you notice her eyebrows? How cute is that? Yes, she'll have very long horns. You really need to come. We have some really cute Shorthorns as well.

Sheila said...

I know nothing about cows/cattle, but she is beautiful. Will her coloring stay the same as she gets older? Thanks so much for sharing.

Krissy B. said...

OOOHHH!!! I so envey you!! She is beautiful! My husband said we should do a road trip to this farm. I agree! In the spring or early summer so we can see a baby or 2. Northern Minnesota to Indiana. 12 hrs maybe? we'll look into it. Thanks for sharing. Krissy B.

Tree Hugger - Suzan said...

How wonderful! She's lovely too!
Thank you for sharing this interesting news.

Garrett808 said...

i had always hoped the english longhorn would be in the US again and i'm sure they will cost a pretty penny with the ET and importation costs! wowza! I look forward to other photos of the English Longhorn. They are truly a heritage breed and worth saving. Loev them.

Michelle said...

That is a beautiful calf! Beautiful breed!

Jessica @Blessings in the Country said...

I love her chocolate nose! And her chocolate ears, and the chocolate marbling in her white fur. I have never seen a more beautiful calf before!

Muffy's Marks said...

17What a beauty Mary's offspring is. Kudos to you for increasing the herd.

Milah Frost said...

I didn't notice the eyebrows until you pointed it out. I did notice the long lashes though. :)

Florida Farm Girl said...

What a lovely calf!! Could we see a picture of Mary, too?

Blue Alliance, Prime Grassfinished Lamb said...

Awesome! I've been trying for years and years to contact Longhorn breeders to import embryos... Never a peep. Congratulations! Watch those udders though, the Brits don't mind 'sausage tits' on their Longhorn cows, I noticed.

Benita said...

She is such a pretty calf. I love those red ears and that nose.

Kim said...

It's so wonderful to hear about endangered breeds being preserved!

Elaine said...

What a beautiful little girl and such lovely long lashes!!

Michelle said...

I've always loved that coloring but have only heard of shorthorns before this. Now I'm going to have to go search for photos of mature longhorns; thanks for the enlightenment -- and congrats!

Diane Cayton-Hakey said...

She's absolutely gorgeous! A queen indeed!